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cooking
with LAMB
 

Selecting Lamb Cuts

RACK OF LAMB

Rack of lamb comes from the front/middle section. Rib chops are single or double chops cut from the rack. The rack starts at the lamb saddle and goes through the full eye muscle (a  premium cut ideal for quick cooking to maximize its tender, juicy qualities). A rack can be frenched (fat and tissue between the bones is removed), capoffed (the fat cap is removed) or fully denuded (all fat removed).

Tips for cooking an Australian Lamb rack are available in our recipe section.

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LEG OF LAMB

Leg of lamb comes from the hindquarter. It may be a whole leg with sirloin attached, partly boned or a center cut roast. The classic leg of lamb is the most versatile cut, as it can be rolled and tied, butterflied, boned, cubed for kabob or prepared whole. The leg, with little surrounding fat and minimal fat inside, can easily be trimmed to your specifications. The meat is tender yet firm and is suitable for a variety of cooking methods. It is an economical cut for entertaining and great for leftovers. Lamb legs will serve at least six, sometimes more.

Tips for cooking an Australian Leg of Lamb are available in our recipe section.

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LAMB LOIN

Loin of lamb comes from the middle-lower section of the rear quarter. The loin is usually divided into loin chops and lamb tenderloin. A lamb loin can be boned, rolled and tied, or cut into loin chops. This jewel of the lamb is very tender, and cooking time should be minimal.

Tips for cooking Australian Lamb loins and loin chops are available in our recipe section.

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LAMB SHOULDER

The shoulder of the lamb, derived from the forequarter, is the most economical cut. It is most suitable for long, slow, moist cooking to tenderize it. Quite often the shoulder is cut into chops. Lamb shoulder is often used for stew and casseroles. Ground lamb often comes from the shoulder.

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LAMB SHANK

Lamb shanks come from the latter part of the fore or hind leg, and are best roasted or braised to elicit the juices from the bone. Shanks are almost always cooked in liquid until the meat starts separating from the bone. Although long, slow cooking is a must, the flavor and unique taste are more than worth it.

Tips for cooking Australian Lamb Shanks are available in our recipe section.

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